Tag Archive: Harrison Assessments

  1. FREE WEBINAR: Organisational analytics for people

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    Organisational analytics for people

    HIGH PERFORMING LEADERS, TALENT AND CULTURE

    Free 1 hr webinar for people development professionals 

    Friday 12th November 10:30am

    USE OBJECTIVE DATA TO INSPIRE A CULTURE OF ENGAGEMENT, IDENTIFY TALENT AND DEVELOP LEADERSHIP COMPETENCE FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE

    Webinar Highlights:

    • Discover how objective data can support your people plans and business objectives
    • Live demo of online interactive dashboards and simple traffic light colour scheme to visualise group and individual data
    • Get your own free personalised example of your unique data

    Download the brochure here

    We will show you how you can:

    CULTURE:

    • Assess organisational culture and discover risk areas
    • Explore the impact of individual and group behaviours on team dynamics
    • Understand engagement and fulfilment levels across the business
    • See how individuals values align with business objectives and goals

    TALENT:

    • Easily pinpoint strengths and identify High Potentials
    • Drill down to each employees’ key factors
    • Retain top talent by understanding what is important to individuals and groups

    LEADERSHIP:

    • Measure senior and emerging leadership competency
    • Gain insight into the specific set of behaviours that impact each competency
    • Implement actionable development plans that provide guidance and generate enthusiasm

    All attendees will receive their own personalised example of their unique data

     

     

                     

    Quadrant 1 are delighted to be hosting this webinar in partnership with Tribero Ltd.

  2. PARADOX SERIES: OPINIONS

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    Lack of balance in our opinions can make it difficult to make decisions or pull a consistent and successful strategy together. It’s crucial that we gather and consider the thoughts, experience and opinions of others to supplement and contribute to our own knowledge and experience.
    If we are too uncertain and inconclusive, we will spend our time going round in circles – we need to be able to put a stake in the ground to progress actions and plans. However, too much certainty in our own opinions can move into dogmatism which can stifle contribution, collaboration and innovation.

    The paradox of OPINIONS – what it can look like when the balance between CERTAIN and OPEN/ REFLECTIVE is off-kilter, and what it can look like when balance is achieved.

    Leaders need to be able to balance these two seemingly opposite traits – one dynamic and one gentle – to achieve optimal behavioural performance and balanced versatility.

    Harrison Paradox Technology is embraced by organizations world-wide as the best means to determine leadership capability and job performance by providing a reliable map of the paradoxical balances that make or break leaders.

    Find out more or contact us at [email protected] or on 07768 922244

  3. How do you Measure Employee Behaviours Against Your Company Values?

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    Living Up to Company Values

    How do you know when you interview someone for a job that they will live up to your Company Values? How do you measure employee behaviours against your Company Values?

    Here are some examples of some of the values of three of our major high street names –

    Table

    The first and the third have a brief description of what each of them means. The second one is a straightforward list of words.

    Working in large companies as an independent consultant I am intrigued to know what the values mean to the employees. If appropriate during a group session I will often ask who knows what they are and have learnt not to be surprised at the number of people who either don’t know or have them written down somewhere and have to retrieve them in order to answer the question. This is often despite the fact that they are written on large posters all over the building. So why does this happen? It’s simple – it’s about connection, meaning and expectation.

    I am going to use a simple model to explain what I mean.

    The Alignment Model

    Gregory Bateson and latterly Robert Dilts came to the conclusion that we exist at different levels –as individuals, teams and organisations.

    At the very highest level we have a PURPOSE. In organisations this is often put in terms of a mission statement or more fashionably as a simple a Purpose for the organisation. As individuals and teams we have a purpose, whether consciously or unconsciously, behind everything we do and want to achieve and, if stated clearly, this purpose will help to keep us on track.

    At the next level down we have IDENTITY/ROLE. In other words what role do we and others play in achieving the purpose. This is not so much about job title as the changing nature of the roles required of us in relation to each purpose eg, facilitator, coach, educator, entertainer, manager, designer, support, minder and so on.

    Now here comes the level of VALUES AND BELIEFS. What is important to us as an organization, team or individual? Companies spend time determining high level values as seen above and display them on their websites and walls. The expectation here is that employees will understand them, integrate them and live by them at work.

    CAPABILITY comes next. Do we have the capability to fulfill the purpose. What’s missing? If it’s important and we believe it’s possible then this level can be satisfied.

    Effective BEHAVIOUR is the result of all the above levels being aligned. This is the visible part of the process and the one that is often judged.

    Finally its behaviour, often unconscious once it becomes habitual, that determines the culture or the ENVIRONMENT of the organization – it’s the visible and kinaesthetic manifestation of all the levels of above.

    What happens in organisations in relation to values?

    Organisations are very good at coming up with a set of meaningful values. The question is meaningful for who, and how do we test for them at interview and beyond? How do they become part of the muscle of the organization? The trouble with values is that they are generally stated in high level, abstract language that is open to interpretation by individuals if indeed they get that far. Abstract words generally remain just that – abstract! Hence the inability often of people to relate to them, own them and live by them.

    Take collaboration for example. If you were to walk around an organization with this value what sort of behaviours would you see? Collaborating with who, when, about what? Does everyone have to collaborate or just a few people? What does collaboration look and feel like? How do I test for this at interview without asking a direct question about collaboration to which the interviewee is likely to have a prepared answer, particularly having read the values on the website beforehand? Collaboration is a working preference that not everyone is comfortable with.

    And what about humility? How would people demonstrating humility in the workplace be behaving? Or passion? Passion in organisations is often missing if research into job enjoyment is anything to go by. Passionate about what? How does it show?

    The reason for the disconnect is often because organisations stop when they get to the values level. The people who determined the values in the first place know what they mean to them and make the assumption that everyone else will know what they mean. They also, until now, had no way of measuring them effectively.

    Harrison Assessment Talent Solutions

    More than 30 years ago Dr Dan Harrison began to conduct some research into what makes people perform well in the workplace. His research concluded that if people enjoy at least 75% of their work they will do it well and become more productive. He also utilized paradox theory in the design of his unique talent solution which has been developed and refined over the years to become one of the most effective talent solutions on the market today. Basically saying that assessments that utilize a bipolar measuring mechanism are missing the point that people can demonstrate a combination of two opposing traits – it’s not a question of either or it’s a combination of both which produce balanced versatility of behaviour. For example, being frank doesn’t mean that you are never diplomatic. You can have both traits. These two factors alone make Harrison Assessments one of the most effective business tools on the market today. It is this system which can determine the behaviours which sit behind the values and which can be measured by completion of an on-line SmartQuestionnaire™.

    Using the HATS system, organisations can create a template for the behavioural expectations of their employees. This template can then be utilized in recruitment, alongside similar job specific templates and can also be incorporated into the appraisal system if appropriate. This latter has the strong benefit of raising awareness of behavioural expectation as well as giving managers the confidence to ask questions in relation to such, normally subjective, aspects of performance. Such conscious awareness of expectations creates a culture that directly aligns with the values and purpose of the organisation.

    If you would like to know more about matching behaviours to values call 44 (0)7768 922244.

    Pat Hutchinson

  4. We get knocked down… But we get up again – the England edition

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    These insightful Tubthumping lyrics will have been heard a fair few times over recent weeks and years as we saw the England team move closer to a European trophy than we’ve seen in over 50 years. And granted, this song is more about the singers bragging about their drinking prowess than leadership success, but the sentiment still rings true…

    It’s not necessarily the leader or the team who never fail that are the most successful, but those who fail, learn, and come back again and incorporate those learnings that can reap even greater benefits than ever. As Nelson Mandela says,

    The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

    One of the most important qualities of a leader is resilience. Developing resilience, combined with perseverance, will help us and our teams not only to succeed in the good times, but to learn, grow and succeed through the crises, set-backs and ever-changing landscape we navigate.

    Resilience and Perseverance – what is it?

    Someone who demonstrates resilience and perseverance is someone who persists in the face of adversity, obstacles or setbacks including effectively managing a crisis and quickly adapting to change. There are a number of supporting behavioural traits, preferences and motivations identified and benchmarked which we can consider as essential in contributing to this:

    Essential Traits

    • Authoritative: The desire for decision-making authority and the willingness to accept decision-making responsibility.
    • Optimistic: The tendency to believe the future will be positive.
    • Persistent: The tendency to be tenacious despite encountering significant obstacles.
    • Pressure Tolerance: The level of comfort related to working under deadlines and busy
    • Self-Improvement: The tendency to attempt to develop or better oneself.
    • Stress Management: The tendency to be relaxed and manage stress well when it occurs.
    • Wants Challenge: The willingness to attempt difficult tasks or goals.

    Desirable Traits

    Other traits that could be considered helpful though perhaps not as essential in building resilience include; analytical, collaborative, frank, influencing, relaxed, truth exploring, assertive, flexible and open/ reflective.

    Traits to avoid

    As with the philosophy of Ying / Yang – in that most things tend to work best when in balance – there are also a number of behavioural traits which need to be avoided that could seriously hinder developing and demonstrating resilience and perseverance such as:

    • Defers decisions
    • Inconclusive
    • Skeptical
    • Unresourceful
    • Avoids decisions
    • Blindly optimistic
    • Defensive
    • Rebellious autonomy
    • Avoids communication
    • Dogmatic

    3 reasons resilience and perseverance are important for a leader

    The world of work is filled with challenges and what currently feels like a constant need to be adapting to operational challenges, financial challenges and cultural challenges.

    1 – As a leader, it’s our responsibility to lead through the good and bad. Our team needs to know that, whatever else is going on, we are there to support them and to help them learn and grow from the challenges they face too.

    2 – Times of challenge can also be viewed as times of opportunity. Adapting to situations will require creative thinking and problem-solving. Facing and dealing with a crisis can offer a chance to show compassion and integrity. Getting through a struggle can give us a chance to develop and expand our leadership skill set and also to be a good role model for those around us.

    3 – Facing difficulties and helping our teams to develop and grow not just in spite of, but because of those difficulties will help to strengthen our relationships with our teams, and help to build engagement and trust.

     

    Throughout the Euro 2020 campaign Southgate demonstrated excellent leadership qualities, generating respect and admiration across the board. Southgate’s comments on last night’s loss epitomise these qualities:

    It’s down to me… Nobody is on their own. That’s my call and it totally rests on me… We win and lose together.

    Now he, captain Harry Kane and the team will be adding resilience and perseverance to the mix, ready to accept the disappointment of their loss, take pride in what they have achieved together, learn lessons from every match played and every shot taken and move forwards with their eyes firmly set on next year’s World Cup.

    As Harry Kane has said:

    We will look back and look at things we could have done better. That is what we have to learn from … that’s football and we have to get over it and move on. We have to build belief from this, we have a great young squad. We have to dust ourselves down, hold our heads high and get ready for that tournament.

    It’s often said that we don’t know what we are capable of until we have to dig deep, pick ourselves up and overcome a set-back, and that we often surprise ourselves with what we can handle.

    By objectively measuring our resilience and perseverance, we can explore our strengths and identify and consciously work on the areas that can help us improve it, so  it will no longer come as a surprise that we can get through the challenges we face and come out the other side even stronger.

    Well done to the England Team and see you at the World Cup next year… we’ll be cheering for you.

     


     

     

    The traits, preferences and motivations listed above have been identified and benchmarked by Dr Dan Harrison and the Harrison Assessment. Resilience and Perseverance is one of the 10 Harrison Assessment Leadership Behavioural Competencies. This framework measures people’s individual skills and areas for development against 10 essential Leadership Competencies in an objective way.

    Each competency is made up of a series of essential traits, desirable traits and traits to avoid. Development candidates complete a short, online SmartQuestionnaireTM. Responses are then mapped against each of the Harrison Leadership Competencies which can then highlight areas of strength and areas for development both for an individual and for a team.

    You can download a sample Behavioural Competency report here.

    If you would like to find out more about the Harrison Leadership Behavioural Competencies, other pre-defined competencies, or indeed about creating a bespoke competency, please call us on 07768 922244, email [email protected] or leave us your details and we will contact you.

     

     

  5. PARADOX SERIES: POWER

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    As a leader, how do you balance asserting your own needs and wants with helping your team achieve their objectives?

    The paradox of POWER – what it can look like when the balance between ASSERTIVENESS and HELPFULNESS is off-kilter, and what it can look like when balance is achieved.

    Leaders need to be able to balance these two seemingly opposite traits – one dynamic and one gentle – to achieve optimal behavioural performance and balanced versatility.

    Harrison Paradox Technology is embraced by organizations world-wide as the best means to determine leadership capability and job performance by providing a reliable map of the paradoxical balances that make or break leaders.

    Find out more or contact us at [email protected] or on 07768 922244