Tag Archive: engagement and retention

  1. Employee engagement is a personal matter for each individual.

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    Engaged employees who wholeheartedly give discretionary effort help the organisation succeed.

    While employee engagement is now afforded greater focus, energy and resources by most organisations, traditional employee engagement surveys only measure group engagement issues, ignore the individual data that is crucial to engagement, and assumes only their managers are responsible for engagement.

    To significantly increase employee engagement you need to understand the passions, motivations, and expectations of the individual, and use an approach which is based around engagement being a shared responsibility between the employee and the organisation.

    Using objective data, we can map individual employee’s passions, motivations, expectations and the degree to which their expectations are perceived to be already being fulfilled, against eight essential Engagement metrics:

    • Development • Remuneration • Authority • Social

    • Appreciation • Communications • Personal • Work Life Balance

     

    View of top 21 employees alphabetically sorted from a group of 81 employees in total

    What does this tell us?

    The graph above provides a clear picture of this group of individuals; overall fulfilment scores are predominantly high. This indicates that the majority of these employees feel that the employee expectations which are important to them as individuals are mostly being met.

    Do Darvin and Esmerelda appear engaged in their day to day role? Their scores would indicate otherwise, and this will probably be apparent in some way in their behaviours and productivity levels.

    Why may Darvin feel like his opinions are not being valued? What may be behind Esmerelda’s apparent lack of fulfilment in her advancement and desire to lead?

    Amanda, Antoine and Britt look like it wouldn’t take much for their engagement levels to drop either, and there are some areas where various individuals have rated factors as very important (10’s) which are not being fulfilled and could cause some issues.

    The key is to find out what is behind the data

    Each of these people – and everyone else in the group – could all benefit from a positive 1-2-1 discussion with their manager to firstly to explore may be behind these scores and to see why they feel their individual expectations are not being fulfilled, and what could be done by their manager, the organisation and they themselves to improve this, and their engagement in their role.

    We can also see from the number of high scores afforded across the first 5 expectations – the desire for Development, Advancement, a Capable Leader, To Lead, and to have Opinions Valued, that these seem to be the most often identified as being important to the majority, whereas Quick Pay Increases and Personal Help do not appear to be deemed as important to the individuals in the group.

    Room for improvement

    The yellow and red areas indicate those expectations that are not necessarily being fulfilled, and can provide a great basis for 2-way conversation firstly to explore may be behind these scores and then to discuss how both parties can improve the situation and benefit from greater engagement. There may be some personal circumstances which are influencing the scores. There could be some simple local solutions in the team which could be implemented, and individual’s feedback could also be useful in feeding into developing wider organisational plans and strategies.

    This granular level of in-depth engagement analytics can develop your leaders’ capability to engage their teams and retain top talent. Being able to see how individuals’ values align with your organisation’s business objectives and goals can promote open and engaging discussions and make performance reviews comfortable and productive for everybody.

    • Understand individual employee’s expectations and the degree to which there are met.
    • Provide effective engagement intervention for each individual employee by targeting the factors that are important to each employee.
    • Place employees in roles that are engaging.
    • Identify how the organisation can help fulfil the employee’s expectations as well as what the employee needs to do.

    Understand engagement and fulfilment levels across the business

    As well as individual data, an Organisational view enables you to understand collective engagement and fulfilment levels across the business.

    View of employee engagement expectations data from a group of 81 employees in total

    Again, we can see clearly that whereas the overall fulfilment of the group of 81 employees is around 2/3rds satisfied, there remains 1 third of expectations unmet.

    We can also see that ‘Wants Development’ is the highest placed expectation, and ‘Wants Opinions Valued’ is the most unmet of them all. The grey areas show where those expectations have not been ranked highly, and indicates that flexible work time, quick pay increases and personal help are of little value to this group of individuals.

    Explore your data in many different ways

    Interactive dashboards allow you to select groups to analyse by department, team, or manager using customisable tags and easily generate reports. A traffic light colour scheme easily identifies any hot spot areas to focus on.

    Using advanced organisational analytics such as these for PEOPLE means you can measure, identify, develop, and improve across individuals, groups, teams, business areas and behaviours using global and individual data to support people plans, drive action, and to create a culture of engagement and high performance.

    Visualise your Group Data

    This is a snapshot of the high-level Organisational Analytics data available just across Employee Engagement Expectations. You can also get data for your people and your organisation on:

    • Senior and emerging leadership competency
    • Culture of your organisation
    • Collaboration and Team competencies
    • Team Dynamics
    • Emotional Intelligence competencies
    • Remote Working competencies

     

    How helpful would this data be for informing your people development plans, culture and engagement programmes and succession plans?

    You can find out more about Organisational Analytics here. leaders skills and competencies

    If you would like to discuss how Organisational Analytics can help support your business objectives and people plans please contact Pat Hutchinson: [email protected] or on 07768 922244

  2. Is Your Company Brave Enough to Face the Truth?

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    Pat Hutchinson

    Most people use data the way drunks use a lamppost: for support rather than for illumination.

    Alexis Fink, General Manager, Talent Intelligence and Analytics, Intel

    There are any number of ‘talent analytics’ software offerings on the market right now.  Most offer to make the analysis of trends in already existing data such as staff turnover or absenteeism, easier to assess.  Some organisations use them to great effect, others not so much.  There are however, very few organisations offering talent analytics based on what makes people effective in the workplace.

    Advanced analytics are designed to support development interventions which will generate an engaged, progressive culture that is vital to the success of any organisation.  Such a culture will not only increase productivity, it will reduce absenteeism and staff turnover.   Interventions are often seen by the C Suite as a ‘nice to have’ in the light of lack of solid evidence.  HR specialists continue to make their case for interventions but often can’t compete with their operational colleagues who can provide data and statistics to back their arguments for specific actions and therefore investment.

    So what could research based on what makes people successful in the workplace do for organisations?

    Employee Engagement Expectations

    Engagement is a two-way process and surveys should form the foundation of progressive conversations between employer and employee especially if the aim of the survey is to keep talented employees.  This is just not possible if surveys are anonymous.  All an anonymous survey can highlight is that someone, somewhere in the organisation is not happy about something.

    With advanced analytics, you can ask the right questions, and analyse real engagement factors and expectations – such as development, authority, communication, remuneration expectation – across individual, group, and organisation levels. This ensures managers and the wider organisation provide an environment that retains their best talent.

    Who will be Your Next Leaders?

    Expensive assessment centres are universally used for identifying upcoming leaders.  They can take anything from half a day to 5 days and sometimes more to make a selection.  The cost of taking people out of the organisation, and employing specialists to run such centres as well as venue costs, hotel bills (during non-Covid times) all make this a very expensive but still relatively subjective exercise. Current norms are preventing us in many cases from running traditional Assessment Centres but that doesn’t mean you can’t still identify top talent and potential leaders accurately and effectively.

    Companies who use predictive behavioural analytics to develop a framework for remote and automated online assessment can continue to screen for potential talent across areas including role-specific job success eligibility and behavioural success factors, leadership competencies, emotional Intelligence (EQ), engagement and retention factors, cultural fit aligned to organisational values, remote working compatibility and more. This means even if you can’t run a face-to-face assessment centre you can still get in-depth analysis to support the search for and identification of talent for your organisation.

     

    If you would like to know more about how to provide analytics upon which to make strategic decisions about the development of your teams and staff contact us at [email protected] and/or visit our website at www.quadrant1.com

  3. The many ways prospective employers blow it!

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    I’ve just read an article entitled ‘The five ways job applicants blow it!’…  Great stuff and all points that prospective employees should take into account.  It’s also important for employers to be aware of the ways they can blow it too. I have called this article ‘The many ways prospective employers blow it!’ because I am convinced there are more than 5.  So here goes….

    The competition for top talent is fierce – keeping top talent and making sure engagement levels are high is a key factor to success and bottom line impact. So what can employers do to make sure they attract and retain the top talent – or rather, what should they not do?  Here are some major booboos!

    • Failing to recognize that talent acquisition is a two way process. Too many organisations approach talent acquisition as if it is a privilege to work for them.  Whilst there may be some anomalies in the job market many organisations find it difficult to attract talent – this can be to senior positions as well as to their apprenticeship schemes.
    • Making the job out to be something it’s not in the advert! We often hear of people leaving a role fairly quickly because the advertisement has asked for something the role can’t deliver.  A classic example is ‘creativity and innovation’ when every decision has to be referred to the host company and takes months to be acted upon.  Entrepreneurship is another – let’s be honest true entrepreneurs do not work for large organisations.  What the role probably requires is the ability to take initiative, to work autonomously if necessary and maybe a level of optimism about the future.
    • Not saying ‘thanks but no thanks’ to unsuccessful applicants of the first sift. Such a simple step that can do wonders for the company brand.
    • Interviewing on the basis of eligibility factors alone – experience and qualifications are of course an essential part of the criteria. They definitely determine whether a person is capable of performing the role but do they measure their suitability for the role?  By measuring suitability factors accuracy can increase from 40-45% to nearer 90-95%
    • Resorting to subjectivity at the interview stage. Eligibility factors are easy to measure and check.  Interviews are often conducted on a subjective scoring system with the results being calculated and discussions taking place following the interview.  Behavioural questioning can give some indication of a person’s willingness and ability to perform in a variety of scenarios but it can’t measure working preferences which are the real indicators of success.
    • Trying to fit to role by personality testing. Personality testing has little to do with job success.
    • Failing to fit with manager/leader. All too often employers fail to match their new recruits to the style of the manager causing friction and mismanagement and often resulting in the newly found talent moving on to pastures new.
    • Failing to check engagement and retention factors. What actually motivates new talent is not always the same.  It is important to find out what the engagement factors are and be honest if the organisation cannot satisfy them.  What are the employees expectations in relation to development, appreciation, remuneration, communication, authority, social, personal needs and work life balance?
    • Failing to satisfy the GRT of expectations. According to Kevin Kruse the best talent is generally looking for 3 things – growth, recognition of input and ideas and trust – trust in them and the ability to trust in the organization.

    These are just a few of the blunders organisations can make in the pursuit of talent. To find out more about what you CAN do to acquire, develop and retain talent, contact us here or give us a call on 44 (0)7768 922244

  4. Why do your people decide to stay or leave?

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    In this day and age of virtually full employment it can be difficult to recruit and retain your best talent.  Recruitment alone is a costly process.

    So what makes someone come to your organisation in the first place and what makes them stay?  There is a general assumption that if we pay people enough they will want to stay but is this right and how will you know?

    Using Harrison Assessments we can measure 8 factors which contribute to retention and engagement.  We do this objectively not subjectively using an on-line SmartQuestionnaire™

    .  These factors include –

    • Development Expectations
    • Remuneration Expectations
    • Authority Expectations
    • Social Expectations
    • Appreciation Expectations
    • Communication expectations
    • Personal Expectations
    • Work Life Balance Expectations

    The resulting report is the result of 30 years of research by Dr Dan Harrison into what makes people successful at work.

    For further information on Harrison’s Engagement and Retention solution please click on the image below:

    Just call 07768 922244 or email [email protected] to arrange.

  5. How re-aligning culture can put you at the front of the queue in 2018

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    As we begin 2018 and the uncertainty over Brexit continues companies and organisations will be positioning themselves to be at the front of the queue in markets new and/or old.   The productivity equation is a simple one –

    Happy, talented people create great working environments where people want to be productive!

    Achieve this and you –

    • Promote a productive culture
    • Reduce absenteeism
    • Reduce employee attrition rates
    • Promote innovation and creativity

    So what are the factors that make people want to work for your organisation?  Here are 8 to start with –

    They may have expectations for –

    • Development and self-improvement, challenges
    • Appreciation and Recognition for work achieved
    • Remuneration – may not be top of the pole
    • Communication style
    • Authority – autonomy, initiative, leadership
    • Personal expectations – being informed, wants help
    • Social – outgoing people often like to mix work with pleasure (or not)
    • Work life balance – flexible working time, stress management

    If people have wants and desires in these areas and you are not providing them then they are unlikely to be fulfilled in the role and will cost you money when they leave, often after only a few short months.  So what’s the answer – easy – measure them! You can do this quickly and effectively for individuals, groups and/or organisations through one simple objective on line questionnaire.

    OK, so now you have measured your cultural expectations – what if they don’t fit your productivity needs?  What if people aren’t happy, have no authority expectations or development expectations that are crucial to your culture? So now we look to the future to implement the changes necessary.  First we need to know what they are.

    Most organisations have a set of values which they display on websites and on walls around the organisation.  In my experience when I ask people what they mean or even what they are, despite being displayed on the wall, they have little or no idea how to interpret them into behaviours.  This is because they are written in vague language that is open to interpretation. Let me show you what I mean by the use of a simple model of alignment –

    Robert Dilts’ Alignment Model based on the work of Gregory Bateson

    The above Alignment Model is particularly useful when creating a change. Each level of the model impacts on the levels below it. In order to create change you would need to focus on each level and ensure each is in place in order to impact any lasting change on the levels below, which will then result in alignment.

    Most organisations have a fairly clear idea of their purpose and the roles that people play within that.  They also have some words to represent the values of the organisation and that’s where it stops.  Those values never get translated into behaviours and therefore people are unsure of how to act them out.  So what’s the answer?  Again it’s simple – decide which behaviours demonstrate each value and measure them! You can use the same answer sets as for the Engagement and Retention survey – the data will just be arranged differently to align with the values.  You then have the information you need to –

    • Add to existing recruitment processes or  create new ones using Harrison Assessments
    • Design development programmes based on real data
    • Measure your cultural expectations annually quickly, cost effectively and accurately

    If you would like to know about how to accurately assess Engagement and Retention factors and align cultural values please call Pat on 07768 922244 or email [email protected].

    Find out more about the Alignment Model in ‘Brilliant NLP’, co-authored by Pat Hutchinson and David Molden available here